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Up in the Air

by Anchor
List price: $16.00 Price: $14.06 Buy Now

Product description

Ryan Bingham’s job as a Career Transition Counselor–he fires people–has kept him airborne for years. Although he has come to despise his line of work, he has come to love the culture of what he calls “Airworld,” finding contentment within pressurized cabins, anonymous hotel rooms, and a wardrobe of wrinkle-free slacks. With a letter of resignation sitting on his boss’s desk, and the hope of a job with a mysterious consulting firm, Ryan Bingham is agonizingly close to his ultimate goal, his Holy Grail: one million frequent flier miles. But before he achieves this long-desired freedom, conditions begin to deteriorate.

With perception, wit, and wisdom, Up in the Aircombines brilliant social observation with an acute sense of the psychic costs of our rootless existence, and confirms Walter Kirn as one of the most savvy chroniclers of American life.

The hero of Walter Kirn's novel Up in the Air inhabits an entirely new state: Airworld, where the hometown paper is USA Today, the indigenous cuisine wilts under heat lamps, and the citizenry speaks a Byzantine dialect of upgrades, expense accounts, and market share. Airworld even has its own nontaxable, inflation-free currency in the shape of bonus miles, which Ryan Bingham calls "private property in its purest form." Officially, Bingham is a management consultant, specializing in the lugubrious field of career transition counseling (i.e., he fires people for a living). But what Kirn's airborne protagonist is really doing is pursuing his own private passion, his great white whale: accumulating one million miles in his frequent-flyer account. As Up in the Air opens, Bingham has set out on a final, epic traveling jag. He intends to visit eight cities in six days, thereby achieving his own vision of Nirvana somewhere over Sioux Falls, South Dakota.

Mocking the euphemisms of business speak is as easy as shooting fish in a designer barrel. But Kirn also takes on the corporate world's weirdly mystical and paranoid side, its rhetoric of personal empowerment and its messianic devotion to gurus. "Business is folk wisdom, cave-born, dark, Masonic, and the best consultants are outright shamans who sprinkle on the science like so much fairy dust," declares Bingham. (This doesn't stop him from working on his own book about "the transformational journey of one mind wholly at peace with its core competencies.") Meanwhile, his junket becomes progressively more surreal, complete with an evil nemesis as well as a mysteriously powerful firm called MythTech that's working behind the scenes. And what's worse, someone seems to have stolen his identity, assuming control of his credit cards and his all-important miles.

Is this model consumer being tracked as he makes his purchasing decisions, like an elk tagged by wildlife biologists? Or is he merely losing his mind? The ending answers these questions perhaps a little too neatly, but Kirn's disturbing satire packs a mighty wallop nonetheless. The writing is as sharp as a tack, punctuated by character sketches as brilliant as they are quick. Bingham and his ilk are modern nomads, dispossessed of physicality but not quite of their bodies. His simulated environment is not mimicking an actual place but replacing it--and that, to the author, is the scariest part of Airworld: "This is the place to see America, not down there, where the show is almost over." --Mary Park

Up in the Air is now a major motion picture starring George Clooney, Jason Bateman, and Anna Kendrick, and directed by Jason Reitman. Enjoy these images from the film, and click the thumbnails to see larger images.





Up in the Air

by Anchor
List price: $16.00 Price: $14.06 Buy Now

Product description

Ryan Bingham’s job as a Career Transition Counselor–he fires people–has kept him airborne for years. Although he has come to despise his line of work, he has come to love the culture of what he calls “Airworld,” finding contentment within pressurized cabins, anonymous hotel rooms, and a wardrobe of wrinkle-free slacks. With a letter of resignation sitting on his boss’s desk, and the hope of a job with a mysterious consulting firm, Ryan Bingham is agonizingly close to his ultimate goal, his Holy Grail: one million frequent flier miles. But before he achieves this long-desired freedom, conditions begin to deteriorate.

With perception, wit, and wisdom, Up in the Aircombines brilliant social observation with an acute sense of the psychic costs of our rootless existence, and confirms Walter Kirn as one of the most savvy chroniclers of American life.

The hero of Walter Kirn's novel Up in the Air inhabits an entirely new state: Airworld, where the hometown paper is USA Today, the indigenous cuisine wilts under heat lamps, and the citizenry speaks a Byzantine dialect of upgrades, expense accounts, and market share. Airworld even has its own nontaxable, inflation-free currency in the shape of bonus miles, which Ryan Bingham calls "private property in its purest form." Officially, Bingham is a management consultant, specializing in the lugubrious field of career transition counseling (i.e., he fires people for a living). But what Kirn's airborne protagonist is really doing is pursuing his own private passion, his great white whale: accumulating one million miles in his frequent-flyer account. As Up in the Air opens, Bingham has set out on a final, epic traveling jag. He intends to visit eight cities in six days, thereby achieving his own vision of Nirvana somewhere over Sioux Falls, South Dakota.

Mocking the euphemisms of business speak is as easy as shooting fish in a designer barrel. But Kirn also takes on the corporate world's weirdly mystical and paranoid side, its rhetoric of personal empowerment and its messianic devotion to gurus. "Business is folk wisdom, cave-born, dark, Masonic, and the best consultants are outright shamans who sprinkle on the science like so much fairy dust," declares Bingham. (This doesn't stop him from working on his own book about "the transformational journey of one mind wholly at peace with its core competencies.") Meanwhile, his junket becomes progressively more surreal, complete with an evil nemesis as well as a mysteriously powerful firm called MythTech that's working behind the scenes. And what's worse, someone seems to have stolen his identity, assuming control of his credit cards and his all-important miles.

Is this model consumer being tracked as he makes his purchasing decisions, like an elk tagged by wildlife biologists? Or is he merely losing his mind? The ending answers these questions perhaps a little too neatly, but Kirn's disturbing satire packs a mighty wallop nonetheless. The writing is as sharp as a tack, punctuated by character sketches as brilliant as they are quick. Bingham and his ilk are modern nomads, dispossessed of physicality but not quite of their bodies. His simulated environment is not mimicking an actual place but replacing it--and that, to the author, is the scariest part of Airworld: "This is the place to see America, not down there, where the show is almost over." --Mary Park

Up in the Air is now a major motion picture starring George Clooney, Jason Bateman, and Anna Kendrick, and directed by Jason Reitman. Enjoy these images from the film, and click the thumbnails to see larger images.






Up in the Air by Kirn, Walter [Paperback]

Up in the Air by Kirn, Walter [Paperback]

by Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group (Fiction: Other Fiction Books)

Price: $10.00 (1 stores)

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Prufrock: Cormac McCarthy on the Intractable of Language (Again ... 11/30/17, via The Weekly Standard

Reviews and Word: Suzi Feay has read Paul Theroux's latest novel and has a few suggestions: “As I ploughed through this semi-autobiographical behemoth about an architect and travel writer obsessed with his siblings and mother, I tried to imagine what a

Walter Kirn: "Blood Will Out"

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l6jpgwgBwyE

A stunning true story from the author of "Up in the Air. " For 15 years, acclaimed journalist and novelist Walter Kirn fell for the pedigreed charms of one Clark.



nostalgebraist:“Cyberia,” the Douglas Rushkoff book from 1994 about the nexus between {early...

“Cyberia,” the Douglas Rushkoff book from 1994 about the nexus between {early internet adopters, the hacker subculture, psychedelic enthusiasts, New Age stuff, cyperpunk, etc. I want to say that much of it would have been absurd even at the time, but who knows). On the one hand, he was writing about the internet in 1994, and presenting “cyberspace” as the next big thing, so credit where credit is due (. ). On the other hand, rather than isolating its parts and distilling the really important ones,... The people you are about to meet interpret the development of the datasphere as the hardwiring of a global brain. This is to be the final stage in the development of “Gaia,” the living being that is the Earth, for which humans serve as the neurons. As computer programmers and psychedelic warriors together realize that "all is one,” a common belief emerges that the evolution of humanity has been a willful progression toward the construction of the next dimensional home for consciousness. Pete takes a deep toke off his joint and smiles. "It’s tapping in to the global brain. Information becomes a texture … almost an experience. It’s surfing, and they’re all trying to get you out of the water. But it’s like being a environmental camper at the same time: You leave everything just like you found it. Not a trace of your presence. It’s like you were never there. "We’re trying to achieve total control over information. "That allows us to decontrol the imprints that are implanted within the information itself. Everyone has the right to exchange information. What flows through TOPY is occult-lit, computer-tech, shamanistic information and majick – majick as actually a technology, as a tool, or a sort of correlative technology based on intuitive will. It’s an intuitive correlative technology that is used by the individual who’s realized that he or she has his or her own will which they have the freedom to exercise the way they want. That’s kind of how I see majick. As he walks the short footpath to house, he comes upon journalist Walter Kirn, who is urinating off the front porch into the bushes below. "We have a bathroom, Walter. ” Sirius may be the only person in Cyberia who can deliver this line without sarcasm. Walter apologizes quickly. "This was actually part of an experiment,” he says, zipping up, and thinking twice about offering his hand to shake. He proceeds to explain that he’s been waiting to get in for almost an hour. He thought he saw movement inside, but no one answered the bell. Then he remembered something odd: “That whenever I take a piss, something unusual happens. When I introduce the seemingly random, odd action into the situation, the entire dynamical system changes. I don’t really believe it, but it seems to work. World sharing and discovery of parallel realities fills the DMT afternoons of "Gracie and Zarkov,” she a published anthropologist, he an established and successful investment analyst. Sex swingers in the 1970s, they became psychedelic voyagers in the 1980s and self-published their findings in Notes from Underground: A Gracie and Zarkov Reader out of their East Bay home. A cross between an opium den and a sex chamber, their bedroom takes up at least half of their house. While most people’s parties end up in the kitchen, Gracie and Zarkov’s end up here in the bedroom, which is equipped with an elaborate lighting system hidden behind translucent sheets on the walls and in the ceiling panels, a remote control sound... […] They’ve become regular Mondo 2000 contributors, avid heavy-metal fans, and frequent DMT travelers. They spend their free hours experimenting with new types of psychedelics and new combinations of old ones. Gracie occasionally manifests the spirit of a female goddess, most often Kali, and the two indulge in hyperhedonism on an order unimaginable by others in their professional fields – hence the pseudonyms. But Zarkov’s practical, rationalist Wall Street sensibilities shine through his storytelling about psychedelics. To Zarkov, it’s all a question of hardware and software. Zarkov makes practical use out of the sublime DMT state to redesign the personality.

Source: ...and they will tell the truth
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Carousel Court

Books


Following the breakout good fortune of his? searing? (The New York Times Book Review) debut novelThe Delivery Man, Joe McGinniss Jr. returns with Carousel Court: a enterprising, original, and exhilarating novel of marriage as blood sport that reads likeRevolutionary Road for the era of The Unwinding. Nick and Phoebe Maguire are a under age couple with big dreams who move across the country to Southern California in search of a fresh start for themselves and their infant son following a devastating trauma. But they proceed at the worst possible time, into an economic crisis that spares few. Instead of landing in a beachside property, strolling the organic commons aisles, and selecting private preschools, Nick and Phoebe find themselves living in the dark heart of foreclosure alley, surrounded by neighbors being drowned by their underwater homes who set ardour to their belongings, flee in the dead of night, and eye one another with suspicion while keeping twelve-gauge shotguns by their beds. Trapped, broke, and increasingly frantic, Nick and Phoebe each devise their own plan to claw their way back into the middle class and beyond. Hatched under one roof, their two separate, secret agendas will smash into in spectacular fashion.A blistering and unforgettable vision of the way we live now, Carousel Court paints a darkly honest portrait of today's marriage while also capturing the middle-class America of vanished jobs, abandoned homes, psychotropic cure-alls, amour via iPhone, and ruthless choices. As bestselling author Walter Kirn says, ?This scathing novel of our strange new century is like nothing else I?ve announce in years.

$6.49

Directory

  1. Walter Kirn Interviews Himself on ‘Blood Will Out’ - The ... Preparing for a hard-cover tour for “Blood Will Out,” about his bizarre relationship with an infamous impostor, Walter Kirn interviews himself.
  2. Walter Kirn Interviews Himself on ‘Blood Will Out’ - The ... Preparing for a laws tour for “Blood Will Out,” about his bizarre relationship with an infamous impostor, Walter Kirn interviews himself.
  3. What Makes a Well-thought-of Writer - Career Advice for Writers O, the Oprah Journal asks six authors the best thing about being a writer and what it takes to be a novelist.
movie  night--up  in  the air
movie night--up in the air
Here are a few of the kinds of movies that I wish Hollywood made more often (like, you know, two or three times a year): a drama that connects to an audience because it taps, in a bold and immediate way, into the fears and anxieties of our time; a romantic comedy in which the dialogue pings with stylish wit and verve; a film that keeps surprising us because its characters keep surprising themselves. The beauty of Up in the Air is that it's all those things at once. Adapted from Walter Kirn's 2001 novel, it's a rare and sparkling gem of a movie, directed by Jason Reitman (Juno) with the polish of a master
Photo by paladinsf on Flickr
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